Spectator Sport: The Cartoons of Sham’s Saturday Smile

1980-ST-06-21-p31
Straits Times, 21 June 1980, p. 31.

Die-hard Singapore football fans will proclaim the late 1970s and early 1980s as the best times for the national team. With the likes of “Gelek King” Dollah Kassim, the tough-tackling Samad Allapitchay, the Quah brothers and a then rising star in Fandi Ahmad, the team made it to seven consecutive Malaysia Cup finals and won twice. Their exhilarating performance on the pitch was captured in countless write-ups in the local newspapers, including a editorial cartoon in The Straits Times known as Sham’s Saturday Smile.

This creation of graphic artist Shamsuddin Haji Akib offered avid football fans fans like himself a punchline on Singapore football, bringing smiles to fans looking forward to Malaysia Cup matches every weekend. After a commentary on how the national team’s performance was being disrupted by coach Trevor Hartley’s ever-changing line-ups, Shamsuddin depicted him as a mad scientist who would not stop experimenting. Responding to various reported incidents of unruly behaviour amongst fans and players, he turned in cartoons with referees wearing helmets and Hartley learning the Malay art of self-defence, bersilat, to control his players.

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Productivity for Life?

Plush interiors, colourful spaces for breakout meetings, and even pods for sleeping on the job — what would Frederick Winslow Taylor say about office design today? Tay lor was the founder of scientific management who revolutionised the design of work environments over a century ago by demonstrating how carefully engineered processes could increase labour productivity.

➜ Read the full column in CUBES #89 (December/January 2017)

Questioning Conventions

Ang Jin Yong and Andy Ang of TrendLit.
Ang Jin Yong and Andy Ang of TrendLit. PHOTO: SAM CHIN

First started inside the Chinese Division of HASS, the Chinese literary society TrendLit has in a few years established itself as a contemporary champion of Chinese writing in Singapore. Founder Andy Ang and current editor Ang Jin Yong share their journey in breathing new life into language that many Singaporeans have come to regard as traditional, and how they have made new connections and convergences amidst the renewed interest in SingLit today.

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