Tag: CUBES

Working With, Not Working For Technology

Before we all had smartphones in our pockets, some of us had a PDA. The Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) may no longer elicit any public displays of affection, but this handheld device was a trailblazer in the nineties and noughties. Designed for managing appointments, sending emails and even reading handwriting, PDAs emerged from the convergence of telecommunications and information technology, foreshadowing the world of tablets and smartphones that we live in today.

➜ Read the full column in CUBES #90 (February/March 2018)

Productivity for Life?

Plush interiors, colourful spaces for breakout meetings, and even pods for sleeping on the job — what would Frederick Winslow Taylor say about office design today? Tay lor was the founder of scientific management who revolutionised the design of work environments over a century ago by demonstrating how carefully engineered processes could increase labour productivity.

➜ Read the full column in CUBES #89 (December/January 2017)

Into the Wild

For urban dwellers – and that’s over half of the world’s population, according to the United Nations – trekking in a nature reserve is a respite from the concrete jungle. Trees are unrestricted by regulations for height and gross floor area. The variety of species is not defined by land-use or conservation guidelines. Greenery is not a single shade, but a palette of textures and hues. Encountering this natural order of growth is a striking reminder (by way of comparison) of how much effort goes into designing, building and maintaining a city.

While city making has traditionally meant concreting over nature, this has given way in recent times to more environmentally friendly ideals. ‘Green buildings’, ‘sustainable architecture’ and entire ‘eco-cities’ are just some examples of how urban planners and architects have acknowledged and even embraced nature by planting more greenery, designing energy-efficient buildings, and investing in blue-green infrastructure. But beyond thinking for nature, cities can be like nature, and step into the wild.

➜ Read the full column in CUBES #88 (October/November 2017)